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Weekly Round-up

Your Inbox: Occupied
Smokey the Bear Says, "Only You Can Prevent Faucet Fires."
Credit: lopilaroe.com

This week, we learned an enormous amount about the global surveillance system built with US tax dollars and with the explicit consent of US representatives.  Word is that there is much more to come from the “NSA files”.

On Friday, join us as we stand in support of the heroic whistleblower, Edward Snowden, who risked everything to bring this truth to the world.  He is already being attacked.  He will need our active, vocal, and persistent support.

RSVP for the Stand with Edward Snowden Rally at 5pm this Friday.

As we read through the documents released so far, two themes emerge with clear relevance to Occupy Wall Street.  One is new insight into the continued merging of corporate and state power.  It’s clear that the PRISM monitoring system is not merely government overreach: it’s enabled by, and inseparable from, corporate control of our daily lives. The NSA slides assert that PRISM would not be possible without the “voluntary cooperation” of each of the corporations – Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo. The profit motive provides little incentive to resist privacy intrusions. Indeed, massive incentives exist to help expand surveillance: over a million private contractors – a ‘digital Blackwater’ – build the spying infrastructure.  These private firms own and operate the technology, and are not subject to public oversight.  It may be that, because of its inconceivable size, the corporate surveillance apparatus is more powerful than even its government clients.

Just as we’ve learned more about who the watchers are, we’ve also learned more about who and what is being watched.  We’ve known that all cell phones brought to Occupy Wall Street events were logged.  Now we know that these numbers can be used to search a giant database, mapping all of our personal associations, past and present – proving there is power in the connections we are building. The system makes little effort to discriminate “citizens” from “foreigners”, and the data is shared with 35 countries, rendering any such distinction moot.  All of us, around the world, are being profiled by a system that never forgets, and is always watching.  The panopticon is here.

But there is hope. This globalization of surveillance is matched by the borderlessness nature of our resistance: from Istanbul to London to New York to Steubenville, we share a medium, and a message. This new common understanding is made explicit by the surveillance state’s whistleblowers: both Snowden and Manning have said in their words and actions that a transparent, open, networked society is necessary – and possible.  As Occupy Wall Street, Anonymous, and the ongoing movements around the world continue to lay foundations for this new society, we are guided by values that transcend citizenship.  As Laurie Penny writes in the New Statesman – “What these hackers are writing isn’t just history – it’s the base code of future human relations, on the most intimate level.”

This is the beginning of the beginning.

– from the ‘Your Inbox: Occupied’ team

Featured Occu-Projects

One of the 100 Stories of what Wall Street Broke is of the #Covington7, who were arrested blocking the revolving door at Covington and Burling, the Wall Street law firm where US Attorney General Eric Holder used to be a partner. Now, instead of prosecuting bankers, the DoJ is pressing charges against the #Covington7 for their act of protest.

These brave women – six of them grandmothers whose lives have been impacted by the mortgage crisis – were arrested conducting a peaceful sit-in against one of the major representatives of Wall Street banks in Washington, DC during the Wall Street Accountability Week of Action.

These brave women need our support. They are currently fundraising for their travel and legal expenses as they stand up for all of us against Wall Street excess.

Occupy in the News

“Gezi Park protests similar to Occupy movement, not Middle East uprisings: President Gül”

At the Hurriyet Daily News, President Abdullah Gul opines that the protests in Gezi Park are reminiscent of Occupy protests. Since Occupy Wall Street came out of the Arab Spring, we’re wondering if he’s missing something…

“Turkey protesters #Occupy New York Times after $100,000 crowdfunding campaign”

The Verge reports that an extremely successful crowdfunding campaign financed a full-page ad in the New York Times on Friday supporting Turkey’s anti-government protesters.

“Les Turcs de New York manifestent en solidarité avec la place Taksim”  Radio France International  covers last Saturday’s rally in Liberty Plaza.

News of last Saturday’s solidarity action for Turkey in Liberty Plaza made it all the way to the French press.

“Two Members of Pussy Riot Popped Up at Bluestockings This Week”

The New York Times and The Village Voice report that members of Pussy Riot have been in town and are here to raise awareness for their cause. As the women said: “Right now we are here on a special mission to try to establish connections with like-minded people and organizations throughout the globe.” In this vein, they met with members of Occupy Wall Street, among others. “We are keeping the spirit alive. Continue the riot.”

“It takes a bold person to tinker with Smokey Bear”

At Summit Daily News a report that an artist and Occupy Wall Street activist has been slapped with a cease and desist order and threatened with jail time and fines over an image of Smokey the Bear she matched with an anti-fracking message. “Only you can prevent FAUCET fires,” was the offending message.

OWS Screenprinters Return to Zuccotti Park for #OccupyGezi

Our favorite screenprinters were up and at it again, printing on upcycled shirts, bags, and whatever was brought to them, this time with graphics supporting the Gezi Park protests, as covered by the art blog Hyperallergic.

Occupy These Actions & Events

Thursday, June 13th, 7pm

  • Retail Action in Support of Bangladeshi Factory Workers
  • Atlantic Center Mall, Brooklyn
  • Join 99 Pickets as we stand in solidarity with the workers of Bangladesh and are outraged over the tragic collapse of the Rana Plaza building, which has killed more than 1,100 garment workers. This follows the fire at the Tazreen Fashions factory last year where more than 100 Bangladeshi workers lost their lives. In our 3rd solidarity action, we’ll visit several retail stores in Brooklyn and demand that they sign on to the legally binding *Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh. The program will be overseen by a Steering Committee consisting of an equal number of representatives of trade unions and companies and one representative of the International Labor Organization and will be enforceable through binding arbitration. Find it on NYCGA.net.

Friday, June 14th

5:30pm

  • 7 Month Sandy Debrief
  • Sheepshead Bay Yacht Club – 3076 Emmons Avenue
  • This week marks 7 months since Super Storm Sandy hit our region and Occupy Sandy formed. Whether you quit your job and have been working full time on hurricane relief for the past 7 months, organized like crazy for the first few weeks and then drifted on to other things, canvassed for a couple of weekends, or did any other variation of volunteering/organizing, we would love to invite you to join us to debrief the past half of a year. We encourage everyone who is working or has worked with folks on the ground to spread the word to them as well. Find it on NYCGA.net.

6:30-9:30

Saturday, June 15th

10am-6pm

  • NYC 99Rise Strategic Nonviolent Movement Training
  • 101 Clark Street, Brooklyn
  • Plug into the movement to reclaim democracy for 99%.
  • We want to train fired up folks (like you!) to be expert organizers, powerful movement-builders, and effective nonviolent actionists with all the skills you’ll need to win back our democracy from the stranglehold of Big Money. That’s why 99Rise is leading trainings across the country to empower as many people as possible with the essential DNA possessed by every successful strategic nonviolent struggle. Join us at this free, intensive, 1-day training and join 99Rise’s nationwide network of civil resistance organizers committed to building a winning movement for real democracy. Find it on NYCGA.net.

12pm-6pm

  • Assata Shakur’s Legacy and Lives of Resistance: Free University Teach In
  • Marcus Garvey Park (enter south side at 120th St and 5th Ave)
  • The actions and writings of Assata Shakur, a Black Liberation activist living in exile in Cuba, have been influential to a wide range of activists. Our event theme – “Assata Shakur’s Legacy & Lives of Resistance” – connects Assata Shakur’s political and personal work with a network of people who have dedicated our lives to struggle, celebration, and social change. In solidarity with the “Assata Teach-In” series, Free University-NYC and Brecht Forum invite friends, families, comrades, and community groups to learn and share transformative education in public space. A potluck dinner will be served at 6pm (please RSVP so we can prepare enough food). Find it on NYCGA.net.

12pm

Monday, June 17th, 8:00am-6:00pm

  • New York Crossroads: Rally to Stop Fracking and Say Yes to Renewable Energy
  • New York State Capitol Building
  • Occupy the Pipeline  will be among the myriad environmental groups, concerned citizens, and advocates of renewable energy to deliver the message of sustainability to Governor Cuomo on June 17th. We stand at a crossroads and the time is now to write New York’s future! Who will be there: Anti-fracking leaders (including members of Occupy The Pipeline), renewable energy leaders, scientists, farmers, business owners, health professionals, students, parents, grandparents, kids, artists, elected officials, you, your neighbors, and more!

Wednesday, June 26th, 11:30am

  • A Flash Mob to Protect Our City
  • Park Row and Chambers St at base of Brooklyn Bridge
  • Join Occupy the Pipeline for a highly visual and spectacular action in front of City Hall including music and giant pipeline puppets vs solar panels and windmills. Let’s show our representatives we demand a city that runs on clean, renewable energy – and we want an end to fracked, shale gas infrastructure! Please be on time and ready to participate! Find it on NYCGA.net.

Weekly Round-up

Your Inbox: Occupied
Smokey the Bear Says, "Only You Can Prevent Faucet Fires."
Credit: lopilaroe.com

This week, we learned an enormous amount about the global surveillance system built with US tax dollars and with the explicit consent of US representatives.  Word is that there is much more to come from the “NSA files”.

On Friday, join us as we stand in support of the heroic whistleblower, Edward Snowden, who risked everything to bring this truth to the world.  He is already being attacked.  He will need our active, vocal, and persistent support.

RSVP for the Stand with Edward Snowden Rally at 5pm this Friday.

As we read through the documents released so far, two themes emerge with clear relevance to Occupy Wall Street.  One is new insight into the continued merging of corporate and state power.  It’s clear that the PRISM monitoring system is not merely government overreach: it’s enabled by, and inseparable from, corporate control of our daily lives. The NSA slides assert that PRISM would not be possible without the “voluntary cooperation” of each of the corporations – Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo. The profit motive provides little incentive to resist privacy intrusions. Indeed, massive incentives exist to help expand surveillance: over a million private contractors – a ‘digital Blackwater’ – build the spying infrastructure.  These private firms own and operate the technology, and are not subject to public oversight.  It may be that, because of its inconceivable size, the corporate surveillance apparatus is more powerful than even its government clients.

Just as we’ve learned more about who the watchers are, we’ve also learned more about who and what is being watched.  We’ve known that all cell phones brought to Occupy Wall Street events were logged.  Now we know that these numbers can be used to search a giant database, mapping all of our personal associations, past and present – proving there is power in the connections we are building. The system makes little effort to discriminate “citizens” from “foreigners”, and the data is shared with 35 countries, rendering any such distinction moot.  All of us, around the world, are being profiled by a system that never forgets, and is always watching.  The panopticon is here.

But there is hope. This globalization of surveillance is matched by the borderlessness nature of our resistance: from Istanbul to London to New York to Steubenville, we share a medium, and a message. This new common understanding is made explicit by the surveillance state’s whistleblowers: both Snowden and Manning have said in their words and actions that a transparent, open, networked society is necessary – and possible.  As Occupy Wall Street, Anonymous, and the ongoing movements around the world continue to lay foundations for this new society, we are guided by values that transcend citizenship.  As Laurie Penny writes in the New Statesman – “What these hackers are writing isn’t just history – it’s the base code of future human relations, on the most intimate level.”

This is the beginning of the beginning.

– from the ‘Your Inbox: Occupied’ team

Featured Occu-Projects

One of the 100 Stories of what Wall Street Broke is of the #Covington7, who were arrested blocking the revolving door at Covington and Burling, the Wall Street law firm where US Attorney General Eric Holder used to be a partner. Now, instead of prosecuting bankers, the DoJ is pressing charges against the #Covington7 for their act of protest.

These brave women – six of them grandmothers whose lives have been impacted by the mortgage crisis – were arrested conducting a peaceful sit-in against one of the major representatives of Wall Street banks in Washington, DC during the Wall Street Accountability Week of Action.

These brave women need our support. They are currently fundraising for their travel and legal expenses as they stand up for all of us against Wall Street excess.

Occupy in the News

“Gezi Park protests similar to Occupy movement, not Middle East uprisings: President Gül”

At the Hurriyet Daily News, President Abdullah Gul opines that the protests in Gezi Park are reminiscent of Occupy protests. Since Occupy Wall Street came out of the Arab Spring, we’re wondering if he’s missing something…

“Turkey protesters #Occupy New York Times after $100,000 crowdfunding campaign”

The Verge reports that an extremely successful crowdfunding campaign financed a full-page ad in the New York Times on Friday supporting Turkey’s anti-government protesters.

“Les Turcs de New York manifestent en solidarité avec la place Taksim”  Radio France International  covers last Saturday’s rally in Liberty Plaza.

News of last Saturday’s solidarity action for Turkey in Liberty Plaza made it all the way to the French press.

“Two Members of Pussy Riot Popped Up at Bluestockings This Week”

The New York Times and The Village Voice report that members of Pussy Riot have been in town and are here to raise awareness for their cause. As the women said: “Right now we are here on a special mission to try to establish connections with like-minded people and organizations throughout the globe.” In this vein, they met with members of Occupy Wall Street, among others. “We are keeping the spirit alive. Continue the riot.”

“It takes a bold person to tinker with Smokey Bear”

At Summit Daily News a report that an artist and Occupy Wall Street activist has been slapped with a cease and desist order and threatened with jail time and fines over an image of Smokey the Bear she matched with an anti-fracking message. “Only you can prevent FAUCET fires,” was the offending message.

OWS Screenprinters Return to Zuccotti Park for #OccupyGezi

Our favorite screenprinters were up and at it again, printing on upcycled shirts, bags, and whatever was brought to them, this time with graphics supporting the Gezi Park protests, as covered by the art blog Hyperallergic.

Occupy These Actions & Events

Thursday, June 13th, 7pm

  • Retail Action in Support of Bangladeshi Factory Workers
  • Atlantic Center Mall, Brooklyn
  • Join 99 Pickets as we stand in solidarity with the workers of Bangladesh and are outraged over the tragic collapse of the Rana Plaza building, which has killed more than 1,100 garment workers. This follows the fire at the Tazreen Fashions factory last year where more than 100 Bangladeshi workers lost their lives. In our 3rd solidarity action, we’ll visit several retail stores in Brooklyn and demand that they sign on to the legally binding *Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh. The program will be overseen by a Steering Committee consisting of an equal number of representatives of trade unions and companies and one representative of the International Labor Organization and will be enforceable through binding arbitration. Find it on NYCGA.net.

Friday, June 14th

5:30pm

  • 7 Month Sandy Debrief
  • Sheepshead Bay Yacht Club – 3076 Emmons Avenue
  • This week marks 7 months since Super Storm Sandy hit our region and Occupy Sandy formed. Whether you quit your job and have been working full time on hurricane relief for the past 7 months, organized like crazy for the first few weeks and then drifted on to other things, canvassed for a couple of weekends, or did any other variation of volunteering/organizing, we would love to invite you to join us to debrief the past half of a year. We encourage everyone who is working or has worked with folks on the ground to spread the word to them as well. Find it on NYCGA.net.

6:30-9:30

Saturday, June 15th

10am-6pm

  • NYC 99Rise Strategic Nonviolent Movement Training
  • 101 Clark Street, Brooklyn
  • Plug into the movement to reclaim democracy for 99%.
  • We want to train fired up folks (like you!) to be expert organizers, powerful movement-builders, and effective nonviolent actionists with all the skills you’ll need to win back our democracy from the stranglehold of Big Money. That’s why 99Rise is leading trainings across the country to empower as many people as possible with the essential DNA possessed by every successful strategic nonviolent struggle. Join us at this free, intensive, 1-day training and join 99Rise’s nationwide network of civil resistance organizers committed to building a winning movement for real democracy. Find it on NYCGA.net.

12pm-6pm

  • Assata Shakur’s Legacy and Lives of Resistance: Free University Teach In
  • Marcus Garvey Park (enter south side at 120th St and 5th Ave)
  • The actions and writings of Assata Shakur, a Black Liberation activist living in exile in Cuba, have been influential to a wide range of activists. Our event theme – “Assata Shakur’s Legacy & Lives of Resistance” – connects Assata Shakur’s political and personal work with a network of people who have dedicated our lives to struggle, celebration, and social change. In solidarity with the “Assata Teach-In” series, Free University-NYC and Brecht Forum invite friends, families, comrades, and community groups to learn and share transformative education in public space. A potluck dinner will be served at 6pm (please RSVP so we can prepare enough food). Find it on NYCGA.net.

12pm

Monday, June 17th, 8:00am-6:00pm

  • New York Crossroads: Rally to Stop Fracking and Say Yes to Renewable Energy
  • New York State Capitol Building
  • Occupy the Pipeline  will be among the myriad environmental groups, concerned citizens, and advocates of renewable energy to deliver the message of sustainability to Governor Cuomo on June 17th. We stand at a crossroads and the time is now to write New York’s future! Who will be there: Anti-fracking leaders (including members of Occupy The Pipeline), renewable energy leaders, scientists, farmers, business owners, health professionals, students, parents, grandparents, kids, artists, elected officials, you, your neighbors, and more!

Wednesday, June 26th, 11:30am

  • A Flash Mob to Protect Our City
  • Park Row and Chambers St at base of Brooklyn Bridge
  • Join Occupy the Pipeline for a highly visual and spectacular action in front of City Hall including music and giant pipeline puppets vs solar panels and windmills. Let’s show our representatives we demand a city that runs on clean, renewable energy – and we want an end to fracked, shale gas infrastructure! Please be on time and ready to participate! Find it on NYCGA.net.

Weekly Round-up

Your Inbox: Occupied
Smokey the Bear Says, "Only You Can Prevent Faucet Fires."
Credit: lopilaroe.com

This week, we learned an enormous amount about the global surveillance system built with US tax dollars and with the explicit consent of US representatives.  Word is that there is much more to come from the “NSA files”.

On Friday, join us as we stand in support of the heroic whistleblower, Edward Snowden, who risked everything to bring this truth to the world.  He is already being attacked.  He will need our active, vocal, and persistent support.

RSVP for the Stand with Edward Snowden Rally at 5pm this Friday.

As we read through the documents released so far, two themes emerge with clear relevance to Occupy Wall Street.  One is new insight into the continued merging of corporate and state power.  It’s clear that the PRISM monitoring system is not merely government overreach: it’s enabled by, and inseparable from, corporate control of our daily lives. The NSA slides assert that PRISM would not be possible without the “voluntary cooperation” of each of the corporations – Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo. The profit motive provides little incentive to resist privacy intrusions. Indeed, massive incentives exist to help expand surveillance: over a million private contractors – a ‘digital Blackwater’ – build the spying infrastructure.  These private firms own and operate the technology, and are not subject to public oversight.  It may be that, because of its inconceivable size, the corporate surveillance apparatus is more powerful than even its government clients.

Just as we’ve learned more about who the watchers are, we’ve also learned more about who and what is being watched.  We’ve known that all cell phones brought to Occupy Wall Street events were logged.  Now we know that these numbers can be used to search a giant database, mapping all of our personal associations, past and present – proving there is power in the connections we are building. The system makes little effort to discriminate “citizens” from “foreigners”, and the data is shared with 35 countries, rendering any such distinction moot.  All of us, around the world, are being profiled by a system that never forgets, and is always watching.  The panopticon is here.

But there is hope. This globalization of surveillance is matched by the borderlessness nature of our resistance: from Istanbul to London to New York to Steubenville, we share a medium, and a message. This new common understanding is made explicit by the surveillance state’s whistleblowers: both Snowden and Manning have said in their words and actions that a transparent, open, networked society is necessary – and possible.  As Occupy Wall Street, Anonymous, and the ongoing movements around the world continue to lay foundations for this new society, we are guided by values that transcend citizenship.  As Laurie Penny writes in the New Statesman – “What these hackers are writing isn’t just history – it’s the base code of future human relations, on the most intimate level.”

This is the beginning of the beginning.

– from the ‘Your Inbox: Occupied’ team

Featured Occu-Projects

One of the 100 Stories of what Wall Street Broke is of the #Covington7, who were arrested blocking the revolving door at Covington and Burling, the Wall Street law firm where US Attorney General Eric Holder used to be a partner. Now, instead of prosecuting bankers, the DoJ is pressing charges against the #Covington7 for their act of protest.

These brave women – six of them grandmothers whose lives have been impacted by the mortgage crisis – were arrested conducting a peaceful sit-in against one of the major representatives of Wall Street banks in Washington, DC during the Wall Street Accountability Week of Action.

These brave women need our support. They are currently fundraising for their travel and legal expenses as they stand up for all of us against Wall Street excess.

Occupy in the News

“Gezi Park protests similar to Occupy movement, not Middle East uprisings: President Gül”

At the Hurriyet Daily News, President Abdullah Gul opines that the protests in Gezi Park are reminiscent of Occupy protests. Since Occupy Wall Street came out of the Arab Spring, we’re wondering if he’s missing something…

“Turkey protesters #Occupy New York Times after $100,000 crowdfunding campaign”

The Verge reports that an extremely successful crowdfunding campaign financed a full-page ad in the New York Times on Friday supporting Turkey’s anti-government protesters.

“Les Turcs de New York manifestent en solidarité avec la place Taksim”  Radio France International  covers last Saturday’s rally in Liberty Plaza.

News of last Saturday’s solidarity action for Turkey in Liberty Plaza made it all the way to the French press.

“Two Members of Pussy Riot Popped Up at Bluestockings This Week”

The New York Times and The Village Voice report that members of Pussy Riot have been in town and are here to raise awareness for their cause. As the women said: “Right now we are here on a special mission to try to establish connections with like-minded people and organizations throughout the globe.” In this vein, they met with members of Occupy Wall Street, among others. “We are keeping the spirit alive. Continue the riot.”

“It takes a bold person to tinker with Smokey Bear”

At Summit Daily News a report that an artist and Occupy Wall Street activist has been slapped with a cease and desist order and threatened with jail time and fines over an image of Smokey the Bear she matched with an anti-fracking message. “Only you can prevent FAUCET fires,” was the offending message.

OWS Screenprinters Return to Zuccotti Park for #OccupyGezi

Our favorite screenprinters were up and at it again, printing on upcycled shirts, bags, and whatever was brought to them, this time with graphics supporting the Gezi Park protests, as covered by the art blog Hyperallergic.

Occupy These Actions & Events

Thursday, June 13th, 7pm

  • Retail Action in Support of Bangladeshi Factory Workers
  • Atlantic Center Mall, Brooklyn
  • Join 99 Pickets as we stand in solidarity with the workers of Bangladesh and are outraged over the tragic collapse of the Rana Plaza building, which has killed more than 1,100 garment workers. This follows the fire at the Tazreen Fashions factory last year where more than 100 Bangladeshi workers lost their lives. In our 3rd solidarity action, we’ll visit several retail stores in Brooklyn and demand that they sign on to the legally binding *Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh. The program will be overseen by a Steering Committee consisting of an equal number of representatives of trade unions and companies and one representative of the International Labor Organization and will be enforceable through binding arbitration. Find it on NYCGA.net.

Friday, June 14th

5:30pm

  • 7 Month Sandy Debrief
  • Sheepshead Bay Yacht Club – 3076 Emmons Avenue
  • This week marks 7 months since Super Storm Sandy hit our region and Occupy Sandy formed. Whether you quit your job and have been working full time on hurricane relief for the past 7 months, organized like crazy for the first few weeks and then drifted on to other things, canvassed for a couple of weekends, or did any other variation of volunteering/organizing, we would love to invite you to join us to debrief the past half of a year. We encourage everyone who is working or has worked with folks on the ground to spread the word to them as well. Find it on NYCGA.net.

6:30-9:30

Saturday, June 15th

10am-6pm

  • NYC 99Rise Strategic Nonviolent Movement Training
  • 101 Clark Street, Brooklyn
  • Plug into the movement to reclaim democracy for 99%.
  • We want to train fired up folks (like you!) to be expert organizers, powerful movement-builders, and effective nonviolent actionists with all the skills you’ll need to win back our democracy from the stranglehold of Big Money. That’s why 99Rise is leading trainings across the country to empower as many people as possible with the essential DNA possessed by every successful strategic nonviolent struggle. Join us at this free, intensive, 1-day training and join 99Rise’s nationwide network of civil resistance organizers committed to building a winning movement for real democracy. Find it on NYCGA.net.

12pm-6pm

  • Assata Shakur’s Legacy and Lives of Resistance: Free University Teach In
  • Marcus Garvey Park (enter south side at 120th St and 5th Ave)
  • The actions and writings of Assata Shakur, a Black Liberation activist living in exile in Cuba, have been influential to a wide range of activists. Our event theme – “Assata Shakur’s Legacy & Lives of Resistance” – connects Assata Shakur’s political and personal work with a network of people who have dedicated our lives to struggle, celebration, and social change. In solidarity with the “Assata Teach-In” series, Free University-NYC and Brecht Forum invite friends, families, comrades, and community groups to learn and share transformative education in public space. A potluck dinner will be served at 6pm (please RSVP so we can prepare enough food). Find it on NYCGA.net.

12pm

Monday, June 17th, 8:00am-6:00pm

  • New York Crossroads: Rally to Stop Fracking and Say Yes to Renewable Energy
  • New York State Capitol Building
  • Occupy the Pipeline  will be among the myriad environmental groups, concerned citizens, and advocates of renewable energy to deliver the message of sustainability to Governor Cuomo on June 17th. We stand at a crossroads and the time is now to write New York’s future! Who will be there: Anti-fracking leaders (including members of Occupy The Pipeline), renewable energy leaders, scientists, farmers, business owners, health professionals, students, parents, grandparents, kids, artists, elected officials, you, your neighbors, and more!

Wednesday, June 26th, 11:30am

  • A Flash Mob to Protect Our City
  • Park Row and Chambers St at base of Brooklyn Bridge
  • Join Occupy the Pipeline for a highly visual and spectacular action in front of City Hall including music and giant pipeline puppets vs solar panels and windmills. Let’s show our representatives we demand a city that runs on clean, renewable energy – and we want an end to fracked, shale gas infrastructure! Please be on time and ready to participate! Find it on NYCGA.net.

Weekly Round-up

Your Inbox: Occupied
Smokey the Bear Says, "Only You Can Prevent Faucet Fires."
Credit: lopilaroe.com

This week, we learned an enormous amount about the global surveillance system built with US tax dollars and with the explicit consent of US representatives.  Word is that there is much more to come from the “NSA files”.

On Friday, join us as we stand in support of the heroic whistleblower, Edward Snowden, who risked everything to bring this truth to the world.  He is already being attacked.  He will need our active, vocal, and persistent support.

RSVP for the Stand with Edward Snowden Rally at 5pm this Friday.

As we read through the documents released so far, two themes emerge with clear relevance to Occupy Wall Street.  One is new insight into the continued merging of corporate and state power.  It’s clear that the PRISM monitoring system is not merely government overreach: it’s enabled by, and inseparable from, corporate control of our daily lives. The NSA slides assert that PRISM would not be possible without the “voluntary cooperation” of each of the corporations – Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo. The profit motive provides little incentive to resist privacy intrusions. Indeed, massive incentives exist to help expand surveillance: over a million private contractors – a ‘digital Blackwater’ – build the spying infrastructure.  These private firms own and operate the technology, and are not subject to public oversight.  It may be that, because of its inconceivable size, the corporate surveillance apparatus is more powerful than even its government clients.

Just as we’ve learned more about who the watchers are, we’ve also learned more about who and what is being watched.  We’ve known that all cell phones brought to Occupy Wall Street events were logged.  Now we know that these numbers can be used to search a giant database, mapping all of our personal associations, past and present – proving there is power in the connections we are building. The system makes little effort to discriminate “citizens” from “foreigners”, and the data is shared with 35 countries, rendering any such distinction moot.  All of us, around the world, are being profiled by a system that never forgets, and is always watching.  The panopticon is here.

But there is hope. This globalization of surveillance is matched by the borderlessness nature of our resistance: from Istanbul to London to New York to Steubenville, we share a medium, and a message. This new common understanding is made explicit by the surveillance state’s whistleblowers: both Snowden and Manning have said in their words and actions that a transparent, open, networked society is necessary – and possible.  As Occupy Wall Street, Anonymous, and the ongoing movements around the world continue to lay foundations for this new society, we are guided by values that transcend citizenship.  As Laurie Penny writes in the New Statesman – “What these hackers are writing isn’t just history – it’s the base code of future human relations, on the most intimate level.”

This is the beginning of the beginning.

– from the ‘Your Inbox: Occupied’ team

Featured Occu-Projects

One of the 100 Stories of what Wall Street Broke is of the #Covington7, who were arrested blocking the revolving door at Covington and Burling, the Wall Street law firm where US Attorney General Eric Holder used to be a partner. Now, instead of prosecuting bankers, the DoJ is pressing charges against the #Covington7 for their act of protest.

These brave women – six of them grandmothers whose lives have been impacted by the mortgage crisis – were arrested conducting a peaceful sit-in against one of the major representatives of Wall Street banks in Washington, DC during the Wall Street Accountability Week of Action.

These brave women need our support. They are currently fundraising for their travel and legal expenses as they stand up for all of us against Wall Street excess.

Occupy in the News

“Gezi Park protests similar to Occupy movement, not Middle East uprisings: President Gül”

At the Hurriyet Daily News, President Abdullah Gul opines that the protests in Gezi Park are reminiscent of Occupy protests. Since Occupy Wall Street came out of the Arab Spring, we’re wondering if he’s missing something…

“Turkey protesters #Occupy New York Times after $100,000 crowdfunding campaign”

The Verge reports that an extremely successful crowdfunding campaign financed a full-page ad in the New York Times on Friday supporting Turkey’s anti-government protesters.

“Les Turcs de New York manifestent en solidarité avec la place Taksim”  Radio France International  covers last Saturday’s rally in Liberty Plaza.

News of last Saturday’s solidarity action for Turkey in Liberty Plaza made it all the way to the French press.

“Two Members of Pussy Riot Popped Up at Bluestockings This Week”

The New York Times and The Village Voice report that members of Pussy Riot have been in town and are here to raise awareness for their cause. As the women said: “Right now we are here on a special mission to try to establish connections with like-minded people and organizations throughout the globe.” In this vein, they met with members of Occupy Wall Street, among others. “We are keeping the spirit alive. Continue the riot.”

“It takes a bold person to tinker with Smokey Bear”

At Summit Daily News a report that an artist and Occupy Wall Street activist has been slapped with a cease and desist order and threatened with jail time and fines over an image of Smokey the Bear she matched with an anti-fracking message. “Only you can prevent FAUCET fires,” was the offending message.

OWS Screenprinters Return to Zuccotti Park for #OccupyGezi

Our favorite screenprinters were up and at it again, printing on upcycled shirts, bags, and whatever was brought to them, this time with graphics supporting the Gezi Park protests, as covered by the art blog Hyperallergic.

Occupy These Actions & Events

Thursday, June 13th, 7pm

  • Retail Action in Support of Bangladeshi Factory Workers
  • Atlantic Center Mall, Brooklyn
  • Join 99 Pickets as we stand in solidarity with the workers of Bangladesh and are outraged over the tragic collapse of the Rana Plaza building, which has killed more than 1,100 garment workers. This follows the fire at the Tazreen Fashions factory last year where more than 100 Bangladeshi workers lost their lives. In our 3rd solidarity action, we’ll visit several retail stores in Brooklyn and demand that they sign on to the legally binding *Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh. The program will be overseen by a Steering Committee consisting of an equal number of representatives of trade unions and companies and one representative of the International Labor Organization and will be enforceable through binding arbitration. Find it on NYCGA.net.

Friday, June 14th

5:30pm

  • 7 Month Sandy Debrief
  • Sheepshead Bay Yacht Club – 3076 Emmons Avenue
  • This week marks 7 months since Super Storm Sandy hit our region and Occupy Sandy formed. Whether you quit your job and have been working full time on hurricane relief for the past 7 months, organized like crazy for the first few weeks and then drifted on to other things, canvassed for a couple of weekends, or did any other variation of volunteering/organizing, we would love to invite you to join us to debrief the past half of a year. We encourage everyone who is working or has worked with folks on the ground to spread the word to them as well. Find it on NYCGA.net.

6:30-9:30

Saturday, June 15th

10am-6pm

  • NYC 99Rise Strategic Nonviolent Movement Training
  • 101 Clark Street, Brooklyn
  • Plug into the movement to reclaim democracy for 99%.
  • We want to train fired up folks (like you!) to be expert organizers, powerful movement-builders, and effective nonviolent actionists with all the skills you’ll need to win back our democracy from the stranglehold of Big Money. That’s why 99Rise is leading trainings across the country to empower as many people as possible with the essential DNA possessed by every successful strategic nonviolent struggle. Join us at this free, intensive, 1-day training and join 99Rise’s nationwide network of civil resistance organizers committed to building a winning movement for real democracy. Find it on NYCGA.net.

12pm-6pm

  • Assata Shakur’s Legacy and Lives of Resistance: Free University Teach In
  • Marcus Garvey Park (enter south side at 120th St and 5th Ave)
  • The actions and writings of Assata Shakur, a Black Liberation activist living in exile in Cuba, have been influential to a wide range of activists. Our event theme – “Assata Shakur’s Legacy & Lives of Resistance” – connects Assata Shakur’s political and personal work with a network of people who have dedicated our lives to struggle, celebration, and social change. In solidarity with the “Assata Teach-In” series, Free University-NYC and Brecht Forum invite friends, families, comrades, and community groups to learn and share transformative education in public space. A potluck dinner will be served at 6pm (please RSVP so we can prepare enough food). Find it on NYCGA.net.

12pm

Monday, June 17th, 8:00am-6:00pm

  • New York Crossroads: Rally to Stop Fracking and Say Yes to Renewable Energy
  • New York State Capitol Building
  • Occupy the Pipeline  will be among the myriad environmental groups, concerned citizens, and advocates of renewable energy to deliver the message of sustainability to Governor Cuomo on June 17th. We stand at a crossroads and the time is now to write New York’s future! Who will be there: Anti-fracking leaders (including members of Occupy The Pipeline), renewable energy leaders, scientists, farmers, business owners, health professionals, students, parents, grandparents, kids, artists, elected officials, you, your neighbors, and more!

Wednesday, June 26th, 11:30am

  • A Flash Mob to Protect Our City
  • Park Row and Chambers St at base of Brooklyn Bridge
  • Join Occupy the Pipeline for a highly visual and spectacular action in front of City Hall including music and giant pipeline puppets vs solar panels and windmills. Let’s show our representatives we demand a city that runs on clean, renewable energy – and we want an end to fracked, shale gas infrastructure! Please be on time and ready to participate! Find it on NYCGA.net.

Weekly Round-up

Your Inbox: Occupied
Smokey the Bear Says, "Only You Can Prevent Faucet Fires."
Credit: lopilaroe.com

This week, we learned an enormous amount about the global surveillance system built with US tax dollars and with the explicit consent of US representatives.  Word is that there is much more to come from the “NSA files”.

On Friday, join us as we stand in support of the heroic whistleblower, Edward Snowden, who risked everything to bring this truth to the world.  He is already being attacked.  He will need our active, vocal, and persistent support.

RSVP for the Stand with Edward Snowden Rally at 5pm this Friday.

As we read through the documents released so far, two themes emerge with clear relevance to Occupy Wall Street.  One is new insight into the continued merging of corporate and state power.  It’s clear that the PRISM monitoring system is not merely government overreach: it’s enabled by, and inseparable from, corporate control of our daily lives. The NSA slides assert that PRISM would not be possible without the “voluntary cooperation” of each of the corporations – Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo. The profit motive provides little incentive to resist privacy intrusions. Indeed, massive incentives exist to help expand surveillance: over a million private contractors – a ‘digital Blackwater’ – build the spying infrastructure.  These private firms own and operate the technology, and are not subject to public oversight.  It may be that, because of its inconceivable size, the corporate surveillance apparatus is more powerful than even its government clients.

Just as we’ve learned more about who the watchers are, we’ve also learned more about who and what is being watched.  We’ve known that all cell phones brought to Occupy Wall Street events were logged.  Now we know that these numbers can be used to search a giant database, mapping all of our personal associations, past and present – proving there is power in the connections we are building. The system makes little effort to discriminate “citizens” from “foreigners”, and the data is shared with 35 countries, rendering any such distinction moot.  All of us, around the world, are being profiled by a system that never forgets, and is always watching.  The panopticon is here.

But there is hope. This globalization of surveillance is matched by the borderlessness nature of our resistance: from Istanbul to London to New York to Steubenville, we share a medium, and a message. This new common understanding is made explicit by the surveillance state’s whistleblowers: both Snowden and Manning have said in their words and actions that a transparent, open, networked society is necessary – and possible.  As Occupy Wall Street, Anonymous, and the ongoing movements around the world continue to lay foundations for this new society, we are guided by values that transcend citizenship.  As Laurie Penny writes in the New Statesman – “What these hackers are writing isn’t just history – it’s the base code of future human relations, on the most intimate level.”

This is the beginning of the beginning.

– from the ‘Your Inbox: Occupied’ team

Featured Occu-Projects

One of the 100 Stories of what Wall Street Broke is of the #Covington7, who were arrested blocking the revolving door at Covington and Burling, the Wall Street law firm where US Attorney General Eric Holder used to be a partner. Now, instead of prosecuting bankers, the DoJ is pressing charges against the #Covington7 for their act of protest.

These brave women – six of them grandmothers whose lives have been impacted by the mortgage crisis – were arrested conducting a peaceful sit-in against one of the major representatives of Wall Street banks in Washington, DC during the Wall Street Accountability Week of Action.

These brave women need our support. They are currently fundraising for their travel and legal expenses as they stand up for all of us against Wall Street excess.

Occupy in the News

“Gezi Park protests similar to Occupy movement, not Middle East uprisings: President Gül”

At the Hurriyet Daily News, President Abdullah Gul opines that the protests in Gezi Park are reminiscent of Occupy protests. Since Occupy Wall Street came out of the Arab Spring, we’re wondering if he’s missing something…

“Turkey protesters #Occupy New York Times after $100,000 crowdfunding campaign”

The Verge reports that an extremely successful crowdfunding campaign financed a full-page ad in the New York Times on Friday supporting Turkey’s anti-government protesters.

“Les Turcs de New York manifestent en solidarité avec la place Taksim”  Radio France International  covers last Saturday’s rally in Liberty Plaza.

News of last Saturday’s solidarity action for Turkey in Liberty Plaza made it all the way to the French press.

“Two Members of Pussy Riot Popped Up at Bluestockings This Week”

The New York Times and The Village Voice report that members of Pussy Riot have been in town and are here to raise awareness for their cause. As the women said: “Right now we are here on a special mission to try to establish connections with like-minded people and organizations throughout the globe.” In this vein, they met with members of Occupy Wall Street, among others. “We are keeping the spirit alive. Continue the riot.”

“It takes a bold person to tinker with Smokey Bear”

At Summit Daily News a report that an artist and Occupy Wall Street activist has been slapped with a cease and desist order and threatened with jail time and fines over an image of Smokey the Bear she matched with an anti-fracking message. “Only you can prevent FAUCET fires,” was the offending message.

OWS Screenprinters Return to Zuccotti Park for #OccupyGezi

Our favorite screenprinters were up and at it again, printing on upcycled shirts, bags, and whatever was brought to them, this time with graphics supporting the Gezi Park protests, as covered by the art blog Hyperallergic.

Occupy These Actions & Events

Thursday, June 13th, 7pm

  • Retail Action in Support of Bangladeshi Factory Workers
  • Atlantic Center Mall, Brooklyn
  • Join 99 Pickets as we stand in solidarity with the workers of Bangladesh and are outraged over the tragic collapse of the Rana Plaza building, which has killed more than 1,100 garment workers. This follows the fire at the Tazreen Fashions factory last year where more than 100 Bangladeshi workers lost their lives. In our 3rd solidarity action, we’ll visit several retail stores in Brooklyn and demand that they sign on to the legally binding *Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh. The program will be overseen by a Steering Committee consisting of an equal number of representatives of trade unions and companies and one representative of the International Labor Organization and will be enforceable through binding arbitration. Find it on NYCGA.net.

Friday, June 14th

5:30pm

  • 7 Month Sandy Debrief
  • Sheepshead Bay Yacht Club – 3076 Emmons Avenue
  • This week marks 7 months since Super Storm Sandy hit our region and Occupy Sandy formed. Whether you quit your job and have been working full time on hurricane relief for the past 7 months, organized like crazy for the first few weeks and then drifted on to other things, canvassed for a couple of weekends, or did any other variation of volunteering/organizing, we would love to invite you to join us to debrief the past half of a year. We encourage everyone who is working or has worked with folks on the ground to spread the word to them as well. Find it on NYCGA.net.

6:30-9:30

Saturday, June 15th

10am-6pm

  • NYC 99Rise Strategic Nonviolent Movement Training
  • 101 Clark Street, Brooklyn
  • Plug into the movement to reclaim democracy for 99%.
  • We want to train fired up folks (like you!) to be expert organizers, powerful movement-builders, and effective nonviolent actionists with all the skills you’ll need to win back our democracy from the stranglehold of Big Money. That’s why 99Rise is leading trainings across the country to empower as many people as possible with the essential DNA possessed by every successful strategic nonviolent struggle. Join us at this free, intensive, 1-day training and join 99Rise’s nationwide network of civil resistance organizers committed to building a winning movement for real democracy. Find it on NYCGA.net.

12pm-6pm

  • Assata Shakur’s Legacy and Lives of Resistance: Free University Teach In
  • Marcus Garvey Park (enter south side at 120th St and 5th Ave)
  • The actions and writings of Assata Shakur, a Black Liberation activist living in exile in Cuba, have been influential to a wide range of activists. Our event theme – “Assata Shakur’s Legacy & Lives of Resistance” – connects Assata Shakur’s political and personal work with a network of people who have dedicated our lives to struggle, celebration, and social change. In solidarity with the “Assata Teach-In” series, Free University-NYC and Brecht Forum invite friends, families, comrades, and community groups to learn and share transformative education in public space. A potluck dinner will be served at 6pm (please RSVP so we can prepare enough food). Find it on NYCGA.net.

12pm

Monday, June 17th, 8:00am-6:00pm

  • New York Crossroads: Rally to Stop Fracking and Say Yes to Renewable Energy
  • New York State Capitol Building
  • Occupy the Pipeline  will be among the myriad environmental groups, concerned citizens, and advocates of renewable energy to deliver the message of sustainability to Governor Cuomo on June 17th. We stand at a crossroads and the time is now to write New York’s future! Who will be there: Anti-fracking leaders (including members of Occupy The Pipeline), renewable energy leaders, scientists, farmers, business owners, health professionals, students, parents, grandparents, kids, artists, elected officials, you, your neighbors, and more!

Wednesday, June 26th, 11:30am

  • A Flash Mob to Protect Our City
  • Park Row and Chambers St at base of Brooklyn Bridge
  • Join Occupy the Pipeline for a highly visual and spectacular action in front of City Hall including music and giant pipeline puppets vs solar panels and windmills. Let’s show our representatives we demand a city that runs on clean, renewable energy – and we want an end to fracked, shale gas infrastructure! Please be on time and ready to participate! Find it on NYCGA.net.

Weekly Round-up

Your Inbox: Occupied
Photo of Cooper Union building with projection that reads, "you can't evict an idea whose time has come"
You can’t evict an idea whose time has come

The past week has brought a flurry of excitement, as the Free Cooper Union effort has led to over 50 students, faculty, and staff maintaining a sit-in occupation inside college President Jamshed Bharucha’s office on the 7th floor of the Foundation Building of the Cooper Union. 

This occupation comes in response to the decision to begin charging tuition for the first time, ending a 154 year tradition of free education, as well as in the context of the broader unfolding tuition and student debt crisis across the country.

Watch Free Cooper Union on livestream and follow their live-tweets @FreeCooperUnion.

Many Occupy groups have protested outside in solidarity, The Illuminator has projected on the walls, Occupy Museums delivered sushi for dinner.

We stand in solidarity with the students, faculty, and next generation of art students who have lost this amazing gift from Peter Cooper, education which is “free as air and water.”

– from the ‘Your Inbox: Occupied’ team

United Against Pipelines Update

This Monday, hundreds of occupiers and climate activists from dozens of groups came together to challenge President Obama on the Keystone XL Pipeline and climate change at large during a fundraiser he was holding with the 1%.

Check out photos of the action on Flickr, watch livestream footage from StopMotionSolo, and join the protest this Thursday of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper for his promotion of the pipeline.

Occupy in the News

  • Allison Kilkenny at The Nation covers developments with Free Cooper Union, and Felix Salmon at Reuters chronicles the tragedy of Cooper Union.
  • PressTV covered Obama being greeted in NY by Occupy protesters.
  • The Village Voice blog covers DebtFair, an action initiated by Occupy Museums to draw attention to debt and inequality within the art world. “Turn[ing] art fairs and auctions like Frieze New York and Sotheby’s on their heads” the fairs will display art about debt at many populist venues as well as “in front of banks or ‘more arrestable actions’ inside banks…”
  • At hyperallergic.com, Debtfair’s mission was described as such: “…to predicate compensation [for an artist] on their debt load, allowing patrons to make direct payments on their student loans or outstanding consumer credit. By correlating the value of an artwork with the fiscal situation of its producer, it’s an objection to capitalist exchange…”
  • The Arts and Labor Working Group, along with various affected unions, has been agitating for changes in the hiring practices of the Frieze New York art fair. Letters were sent out recently asking participants to boycott over Frieze’s unfair use of non-union labor.

Occupy These Actions & Events

Wednesday, May 15th, 8:30am-4:45pm

  • Justice for Ramarley Graham
  • Bronx County Hall of Justice
  • Join us in court and hold NYPD officer Richard Haste accountable for his actions. Ramarley Graham was an 18 year old unarmed Black male who was murdered by NYPD Officer Richard Haste in front of his grandmother and 6 year old brother in the bathroom of his family’s home on February 2, 2012. The NYPD Officer Richard Haste who executed Ramarley was charged with manslaughter, but other members of the team that were involved in the illegal entry of Graham’s apartment have not been charged.

Thursday, May 16th, 6:30pm

  • May Day Debrief
  • Organization of Staff Analysts, 220 E. 23rd
  • Please come out and hear what happened on May Day and learn how we can all work together to make May Day more successful in 2014! Light refreshments will be served.

Saturday, May 18th, 1pm

  • Occupy Dance
  • Broadway and 21st Street
  • Join us for a Dance Party in the street! Line-up for the parade is at 11am – parade steps off at 1pm. The cabaret law was written to stop the same sort of free association that happened at, and the social consciousness arising from, the occupation of Liberty Square. And the cabaret law is enforced in the same selective way that has been common to the policing of Occupy events. Dance should not be relegated to commodity status, an art form only to be enjoyed as spectacle for the wealthy. Occupy Dance!

Saturday, May 18th, 12pm-May 24th at 3:00pm

  • Operation Green Jobs
  • N. 3rd Street and W. Cumberland St., Philadelphia, PA
  • What are the most dire issues we face? If you’re like most Americans, you’d probably say the climate crisis and the jobs crisis. So why is Washington so obsessed with budget cuts and fossil fuels? Don’t ask members of Congress who have been purchased by corporate lobbyists, ask the ones with the receipts: The U.S. Chamber of Commerce. We’re leading a march of the long-term unemployed from Philadelphia, PA to Washington, DC directly to the Chamber’s front door. Join us in person or virtually for the march.

Thursday, May 23rd, 6pm

  • The Conversation
  • Judson Memorial Church
  • The conversation is an intentional gathering intended to be a social and safe space where activists from the nyc anarchist community, occupy and other radical campaigns can come together to engage in dialogue and understanding and reinvigorate our sense of community.

Friday, May 24th, 8:00pm

Saturday, May 25th

2pm

  • March Against Monsanto
  • Union Square
  • Join us as we march through NYC and show Monsanto, Congress, the President, and the world that we, the people as a whole, united as one, have had enough. Stand beside your fellow brothers and sisters as we stand up against those who wish to do us harm so that they may rake in cash at the cost of our health, lives, and family.

3pm

June 1st, 8:00am -1st of October, 11:00am

  • Re-Occupy Wall Street
  • Trinity Wall Street
  • We are going to Re-Occupy Wall Street this Summer and this time we are going to get it right. This is going to be a Peaceful Protest designed to speak truth to power and wake people up. Everyone is welcome regardless of your skin color, your gender, your sexual preference, your religious beliefs, or political affiliation. We are all uniting as one to Protest Corporate Greed over Human Need and Wall Street International Globalist Banksters that are robbing us blind via Quantitative Easing and Tax Payer dollars going to Banker Bailouts.

June 7th, 6:30-9:30pm

  • OWS Anti-Ticket Quota
  • Liberty Plaza
  • This assembly and rally is to call into question the forced ticket quota system that negatively affects so many New Yorkers lives. From unfair to unnecessary parking tickets to stop and frisk we are ALL impacted in too many ways. This action is also in support of ‘The People’s Agenda’ which has been created to address the needs and help to mobilize the 99% for NYC mayoral elections in November 2013.

Occupy Sandy’s Fight to Restore New York is Still Going Strong

Terri Bennett (with assistance from Jenny Akchin and Brett Goldberg)
policymic.com
Boxes filled the pews at the Church of Saint Matthew, Occupy Sandy hub
Church of Saint Mathew, one of the Occupy Sandy distribution hubs

May Day, or International Workers Day, finds itself at the cross-section of several movements. With roots in the labor movement, it has grown to include space for radical economic justice movements, the immigrant rights movement, the student movement, and, last year, Occupy Wall Street.

This year, Occupy Sandy activists are making sure another growing movement is at the table — the movement for a community-led rebuilding process after the widespread devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy in the city of New York.

Superstorm Sandy affected nearly every person in New York, whether through gas shortages, subway closures, flooding, or loss of employment. But while for most New Yorkers Sandy was “over” when the subway service resumed, for many living in New York’s most affected areas, the recovery process is just beginning. For others still, living in hotels six months later, it hasn’t even begun.

It’s no coincidence that the areas still hurting after Sandy are those most disconnected from the city center, both geographically and economically. In recent years places like the Rockaways, Staten Island, and Gerritsen Beach haven’t done much to fuel Wall Street and the city’s economic growth. They haven’t benefited much from it it either, so they’re easy to ignore.

For many, the disenfranchisement of low income communities before and after Sandy draws major parallels with the experiences of residents of New Orleans before and after Hurricane Katrina. We learned a lot from Katrina — about racism, about economic divides, about displacement — but perhaps the most important lesson was that crises create, for some, an opportunity for profit. Privatization, eminent domain, and large-scale redevelopment were major factors in the post-Katrina picture, and they threaten to be a component of the Post-Sandy recovery picture as well.

But by the same token, there are recovery efforts, both small and large, that local residents and activists are pushing forward in their communities. These initiatives are a serious challenge to the narratives we are used to post-disaster — of large agencies and institutions coming in to rescue distressed communities with a pre-determined, profit-driven plan. They’re creating the possibility for local leadership in rebuilding, and demanding the ability for communities to guide how they are rebuilt. After all, when communities take care of their own needs, there’s less reason for outside institutions to come in and “fix” the problem.

When Occupy Sandy originally mobilized in November 2012, it quickly developed a respected name across the affected areas. For many residents, this reputation was independent from the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) movement.

“Many residents view ‘Occupy’ as any other name,” says Goldi, an Occupy Sandy Staten Island volunteer. “We have a good reputation, and we’ve been on the ground since the beginning, it’s almost like a given because they know us from having helped many of their neighbors.”

As the nature of the recovery work has changed, however, Occupy Sandy’s work has increasingly returned to its OWS roots. Hundreds of volunteers have spent months distributing food and needed supplies, helping residents navigate assistance programs, and mitigating health risks caused by mold and unsafe work conditions. Volunteers will continue to do these things as they are needed.

But new, more forward reaching projects are underway, too. Projects have been taking off, such as a cooperative business incubator to increase residents’ ownership in local economic recovery, a resident-informed participatory budgeting project in Staten Island, and “Wildfire,” a grassroots community organizing and capacity-building initiative in Far Rockaway. Perhaps most importantly, Occupy Sandy volunteers have been vocal allies in calling attention to the failures of NYC’s long-term rebuilding plan, forming coalitions with community based organizations and long-term recovery councils to advocate for a rebuilding process that reflects the priorities of residents of the affected areas.

“One of the biggest lessons learned is that we’ve built a lot of trust with communities by providing services when they were most needed,” says Tammy Shapiro, an Occupy Sandy volunteer. “The strong relationships and sense of trust that we’ve built with residents in the affected areas make us stronger allies and advocates in the fight for a community-led recovery.”

Orginally published  on Policymic.com

Occupy Sandy’s Fight to Restore New York is Still Going Strong

Terri Bennett (with assistance from Jenny Akchin and Brett Goldberg)
policymic.com
Boxes filled the pews at the Church of Saint Matthew, Occupy Sandy hub
Church of Saint Mathew, one of the Occupy Sandy distribution hubs

May Day, or International Workers Day, finds itself at the cross-section of several movements. With roots in the labor movement, it has grown to include space for radical economic justice movements, the immigrant rights movement, the student movement, and, last year, Occupy Wall Street.

This year, Occupy Sandy activists are making sure another growing movement is at the table — the movement for a community-led rebuilding process after the widespread devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy in the city of New York.

Superstorm Sandy affected nearly every person in New York, whether through gas shortages, subway closures, flooding, or loss of employment. But while for most New Yorkers Sandy was “over” when the subway service resumed, for many living in New York’s most affected areas, the recovery process is just beginning. For others still, living in hotels six months later, it hasn’t even begun.

It’s no coincidence that the areas still hurting after Sandy are those most disconnected from the city center, both geographically and economically. In recent years places like the Rockaways, Staten Island, and Gerritsen Beach haven’t done much to fuel Wall Street and the city’s economic growth. They haven’t benefited much from it it either, so they’re easy to ignore.

For many, the disenfranchisement of low income communities before and after Sandy draws major parallels with the experiences of residents of New Orleans before and after Hurricane Katrina. We learned a lot from Katrina — about racism, about economic divides, about displacement — but perhaps the most important lesson was that crises create, for some, an opportunity for profit. Privatization, eminent domain, and large-scale redevelopment were major factors in the post-Katrina picture, and they threaten to be a component of the Post-Sandy recovery picture as well.

But by the same token, there are recovery efforts, both small and large, that local residents and activists are pushing forward in their communities. These initiatives are a serious challenge to the narratives we are used to post-disaster — of large agencies and institutions coming in to rescue distressed communities with a pre-determined, profit-driven plan. They’re creating the possibility for local leadership in rebuilding, and demanding the ability for communities to guide how they are rebuilt. After all, when communities take care of their own needs, there’s less reason for outside institutions to come in and “fix” the problem.

When Occupy Sandy originally mobilized in November 2012, it quickly developed a respected name across the affected areas. For many residents, this reputation was independent from the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) movement.

“Many residents view ‘Occupy’ as any other name,” says Goldi, an Occupy Sandy Staten Island volunteer. “We have a good reputation, and we’ve been on the ground since the beginning, it’s almost like a given because they know us from having helped many of their neighbors.”

As the nature of the recovery work has changed, however, Occupy Sandy’s work has increasingly returned to its OWS roots. Hundreds of volunteers have spent months distributing food and needed supplies, helping residents navigate assistance programs, and mitigating health risks caused by mold and unsafe work conditions. Volunteers will continue to do these things as they are needed.

But new, more forward reaching projects are underway, too. Projects have been taking off, such as a cooperative business incubator to increase residents’ ownership in local economic recovery, a resident-informed participatory budgeting project in Staten Island, and “Wildfire,” a grassroots community organizing and capacity-building initiative in Far Rockaway. Perhaps most importantly, Occupy Sandy volunteers have been vocal allies in calling attention to the failures of NYC’s long-term rebuilding plan, forming coalitions with community based organizations and long-term recovery councils to advocate for a rebuilding process that reflects the priorities of residents of the affected areas.

“One of the biggest lessons learned is that we’ve built a lot of trust with communities by providing services when they were most needed,” says Tammy Shapiro, an Occupy Sandy volunteer. “The strong relationships and sense of trust that we’ve built with residents in the affected areas make us stronger allies and advocates in the fight for a community-led recovery.”

Orginally published  on Policymic.com

Occupy Sandy’s Fight to Restore New York is Still Going Strong

Terri Bennett (with assistance from Jenny Akchin and Brett Goldberg)
policymic.com
Boxes filled the pews at the Church of Saint Matthew, Occupy Sandy hub
Church of Saint Mathew, one of the Occupy Sandy distribution hubs

May Day, or International Workers Day, finds itself at the cross-section of several movements. With roots in the labor movement, it has grown to include space for radical economic justice movements, the immigrant rights movement, the student movement, and, last year, Occupy Wall Street.

This year, Occupy Sandy activists are making sure another growing movement is at the table — the movement for a community-led rebuilding process after the widespread devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy in the city of New York.

Superstorm Sandy affected nearly every person in New York, whether through gas shortages, subway closures, flooding, or loss of employment. But while for most New Yorkers Sandy was “over” when the subway service resumed, for many living in New York’s most affected areas, the recovery process is just beginning. For others still, living in hotels six months later, it hasn’t even begun.

It’s no coincidence that the areas still hurting after Sandy are those most disconnected from the city center, both geographically and economically. In recent years places like the Rockaways, Staten Island, and Gerritsen Beach haven’t done much to fuel Wall Street and the city’s economic growth. They haven’t benefited much from it it either, so they’re easy to ignore.

For many, the disenfranchisement of low income communities before and after Sandy draws major parallels with the experiences of residents of New Orleans before and after Hurricane Katrina. We learned a lot from Katrina — about racism, about economic divides, about displacement — but perhaps the most important lesson was that crises create, for some, an opportunity for profit. Privatization, eminent domain, and large-scale redevelopment were major factors in the post-Katrina picture, and they threaten to be a component of the Post-Sandy recovery picture as well.

But by the same token, there are recovery efforts, both small and large, that local residents and activists are pushing forward in their communities. These initiatives are a serious challenge to the narratives we are used to post-disaster — of large agencies and institutions coming in to rescue distressed communities with a pre-determined, profit-driven plan. They’re creating the possibility for local leadership in rebuilding, and demanding the ability for communities to guide how they are rebuilt. After all, when communities take care of their own needs, there’s less reason for outside institutions to come in and “fix” the problem.

When Occupy Sandy originally mobilized in November 2012, it quickly developed a respected name across the affected areas. For many residents, this reputation was independent from the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) movement.

“Many residents view ‘Occupy’ as any other name,” says Goldi, an Occupy Sandy Staten Island volunteer. “We have a good reputation, and we’ve been on the ground since the beginning, it’s almost like a given because they know us from having helped many of their neighbors.”

As the nature of the recovery work has changed, however, Occupy Sandy’s work has increasingly returned to its OWS roots. Hundreds of volunteers have spent months distributing food and needed supplies, helping residents navigate assistance programs, and mitigating health risks caused by mold and unsafe work conditions. Volunteers will continue to do these things as they are needed.

But new, more forward reaching projects are underway, too. Projects have been taking off, such as a cooperative business incubator to increase residents’ ownership in local economic recovery, a resident-informed participatory budgeting project in Staten Island, and “Wildfire,” a grassroots community organizing and capacity-building initiative in Far Rockaway. Perhaps most importantly, Occupy Sandy volunteers have been vocal allies in calling attention to the failures of NYC’s long-term rebuilding plan, forming coalitions with community based organizations and long-term recovery councils to advocate for a rebuilding process that reflects the priorities of residents of the affected areas.

“One of the biggest lessons learned is that we’ve built a lot of trust with communities by providing services when they were most needed,” says Tammy Shapiro, an Occupy Sandy volunteer. “The strong relationships and sense of trust that we’ve built with residents in the affected areas make us stronger allies and advocates in the fight for a community-led recovery.”

Orginally published  on Policymic.com

Occupy Sandy’s Fight to Restore New York is Still Going Strong

Terri Bennett (with assistance from Jenny Akchin and Brett Goldberg)
policymic.com
Boxes filled the pews at the Church of Saint Matthew, Occupy Sandy hub
Church of Saint Mathew, one of the Occupy Sandy distribution hubs

May Day, or International Workers Day, finds itself at the cross-section of several movements. With roots in the labor movement, it has grown to include space for radical economic justice movements, the immigrant rights movement, the student movement, and, last year, Occupy Wall Street.

This year, Occupy Sandy activists are making sure another growing movement is at the table — the movement for a community-led rebuilding process after the widespread devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy in the city of New York.

Superstorm Sandy affected nearly every person in New York, whether through gas shortages, subway closures, flooding, or loss of employment. But while for most New Yorkers Sandy was “over” when the subway service resumed, for many living in New York’s most affected areas, the recovery process is just beginning. For others still, living in hotels six months later, it hasn’t even begun.

It’s no coincidence that the areas still hurting after Sandy are those most disconnected from the city center, both geographically and economically. In recent years places like the Rockaways, Staten Island, and Gerritsen Beach haven’t done much to fuel Wall Street and the city’s economic growth. They haven’t benefited much from it it either, so they’re easy to ignore.

For many, the disenfranchisement of low income communities before and after Sandy draws major parallels with the experiences of residents of New Orleans before and after Hurricane Katrina. We learned a lot from Katrina — about racism, about economic divides, about displacement — but perhaps the most important lesson was that crises create, for some, an opportunity for profit. Privatization, eminent domain, and large-scale redevelopment were major factors in the post-Katrina picture, and they threaten to be a component of the Post-Sandy recovery picture as well.

But by the same token, there are recovery efforts, both small and large, that local residents and activists are pushing forward in their communities. These initiatives are a serious challenge to the narratives we are used to post-disaster — of large agencies and institutions coming in to rescue distressed communities with a pre-determined, profit-driven plan. They’re creating the possibility for local leadership in rebuilding, and demanding the ability for communities to guide how they are rebuilt. After all, when communities take care of their own needs, there’s less reason for outside institutions to come in and “fix” the problem.

When Occupy Sandy originally mobilized in November 2012, it quickly developed a respected name across the affected areas. For many residents, this reputation was independent from the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) movement.

“Many residents view ‘Occupy’ as any other name,” says Goldi, an Occupy Sandy Staten Island volunteer. “We have a good reputation, and we’ve been on the ground since the beginning, it’s almost like a given because they know us from having helped many of their neighbors.”

As the nature of the recovery work has changed, however, Occupy Sandy’s work has increasingly returned to its OWS roots. Hundreds of volunteers have spent months distributing food and needed supplies, helping residents navigate assistance programs, and mitigating health risks caused by mold and unsafe work conditions. Volunteers will continue to do these things as they are needed.

But new, more forward reaching projects are underway, too. Projects have been taking off, such as a cooperative business incubator to increase residents’ ownership in local economic recovery, a resident-informed participatory budgeting project in Staten Island, and “Wildfire,” a grassroots community organizing and capacity-building initiative in Far Rockaway. Perhaps most importantly, Occupy Sandy volunteers have been vocal allies in calling attention to the failures of NYC’s long-term rebuilding plan, forming coalitions with community based organizations and long-term recovery councils to advocate for a rebuilding process that reflects the priorities of residents of the affected areas.

“One of the biggest lessons learned is that we’ve built a lot of trust with communities by providing services when they were most needed,” says Tammy Shapiro, an Occupy Sandy volunteer. “The strong relationships and sense of trust that we’ve built with residents in the affected areas make us stronger allies and advocates in the fight for a community-led recovery.”

Orginally published  on Policymic.com